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WHAT’S GOOD FROM… Minista Paul Scott and the Occupy Hip-Hop Movement

One morning last month, tired of the state of corporate-owned Hip Hop, a small group of people gathered in front of Intergalactic Records with picket signs saying “Hip Hop Sucks!” That night, a DJ rolled up with some old school Kool Herc-type speakers and started blastin’ classic, underground Hip Hop, shaking the walls of the building. The movement has since spread like wildfire across the country as thousands of disgruntled former Hip Hop fans have begun gathering at radio stations across the country yelling “Give Hip Hop back to the 99%!”

Think this can’t happen? Think again.

With the Occupy Wall Street Movement in full swing, it is only a matter of time before somebody asks the question that will spark the rap revolution.

“Hey, don’t those 1 per centers also control the entertainment industry ?”

I think that I can safely say that 99% of the people reading this are fed up with the current state of Hip Hop and are ready to take it back from the 1% that are controlling the direction of the culture. There are only a hand full of major record labels (Sony, EMI , Warner and Universal) most of the radio stations are either owned by Clear Chanel or Radio-One and the major music video programs are all controlled by one company; Viacom. This explains why the same five Hip Hop artists are being played over and over again.

Without a doubt, Hip Hop is one of the most lucrative commodities on the planet and generates billions of dollars, annually, not only for entertainment companies but also for the other Big Willie corporations that the Occupy Wall Street warriors are fighting against. Also, it can be argued that, unlike many of the resident Wall Street tycoons, the entertainment industry moguls are most dependent on “the streets” for their economic survival, making them the most vulnerable to successful protests.

In his book, “Black Labor, White Wealth,” Dr. Claud Anderson wrote that ” black music is the basis for one of the world’s wealthiest industries.” He also argues that “the historic exploitation of black music and other art forms provides a strong philosophical reason to target these industries as visible examples of a new black economic agenda.”

So, the question becomes not whether an “Occupy Hip Hop” movement will happen but why it hasn’t happened yet. Read complete article at All Hip Hop


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